Levins Tax Law
Schedule your initial consultation:
866-485-7019

Tax Crimes Archives

If the IRS rejects a return, it could be due to identity theft

Technology has done so much to simplify life, but it also complicates it in many ways. The personal information of Massachusetts residents is out there for clever hackers to steal. When that information is stolen in order to defraud the IRS through tax-related identity theft, the only way individuals may know about it is when their income tax returns are rejected.

Cryptocurrency owners may want to watch out for the IRS

Technological advances have made it a challenge for taxing authorities to pursue those they believe are hiding money in order to avoid paying taxes -- until recently, that is. The IRS has worked diligently to find ways to track people who own cryptocurrency in order to make sure they pay taxes on it. For this reason, some cryptocurrency owners, including some here in Massachusetts, could find themselves facing allegations of tax crimes.

Taxpayers may be innocent victims in tax crimes

Like other people across the country, when Massachusetts residents do not know how to do something, they often turn to someone who does. For instance, fixing an electrical problem, treating an illness and even preparing their tax returns often require some help. People rely on those with the knowledge and experience in certain areas to handle matters on their behalf. When it comes to preparing taxes, the person someone relies on could potentially end up committing tax crimes. What happens to the taxpayers?

Got virtual currency? You could receive a letter from the IRS

Boston taxpayers are required to report all of their income, which includes any virtual currency owned. The problem is that it is easy to forget about it and that could draw the attention of the IRS. In fact, the federal taxing authority recently announced that it has begun contacting certain owners of this type of currency via mail.

Have you heard of he IRS's Information Returns Processing System?

Most Massachusetts taxpayers fill out their yearly tax forms, and they make sure they include every dollar of income in order to avoid any adverse repercussions for not doing so. Perhaps it's because they know, or at least suspect, that when it comes to collection taxes, the IRS has many tools at its disposal. One of those tools is the Information Returns Processing System.

3 face tax crimes for allegedly falsifying tax returns

Owning a business is a dream of many Massachusetts residents, but doing so comes with certain financial responsibilities. Most people fulfill these obligations, which include paying personal and business taxes. Every so often, the IRS alleges that certain business owners commit tax crimes by falsifying returns and failing to pay amounts the agency believes are due.

Innocent people pay for taxes filed incorrectly due to scams

It is tax time again. Numerous Massachusetts residents may anticipate refunds while others expect to pay. In either case, filings need to be made, and many people turn to others for help in maximizing refunds and minimizing payments. The problem is innocent people could end up paying for taxes filed incorrectly because they unknowingly became the victims of scammers.

Common tax fraud defenses to be asserted

In prior posts, we highlighted the difference between an honest mistake that results in the incorrect amount of taxes paid, and outright fraud where a taxpayer affirmatively tries to avoid paying taxes. Indeed, it is easy to point out the difference between fraud and mistakes in the abstract, but what defenses are actually available when the IRS thinks that you cheated on your taxes?

Are you guilty of a crime or did you just make an honest mistake?

For most people, dealing with the IRS may not be at the forefront of their plans in January, especially when they have not received their w-2's or corporate bonuses from the past year. Nevertheless, what you do between now and the federal income tax filing deadline (April 17) could subject you to civil or criminal penalties depending on how it is viewed by tax authorities.

Email Us For a Response

Resolve Your Tax Problems

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Framingham Office
1671 Worcester Road
Suite 304
Framingham, MA 01701

Framingham Tax Law Office

Boston Office
38 Newbury Street
6th Floor
Boston, MA 02116

Boston Tax Law Office

By Appointment Only