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Internal Revenue Service Archives

The first tax year dealing with the IRS as a newly single person

Married couples do enjoy certain advantages when it comes to federal income taxes. The exemptions and deductions are often more, which greatly lowers the taxable income they have. The first tax year afterward may cause some shocking revelations when Massachusetts residents divorce. The way they deal with the IRS changes now that they are newly single.

The IRS says some are missing out on the earned income tax credit

It can be challenging for Massachusetts residents to know what credits and deductions they can and cannot take at tax time. One credit that the IRS says many people are missing out on is the earned income tax credit. The agency estimates that one out of every five who qualify for this credit fail to take advantage of it.

A tax time reminder about installment agreements

As many Boston residents start preparing their tax returns, finding out they owe money may come as a surprise. Preparing their returns now could give them the time to save up the money owed, but then again, it may not. Many taxpayers' budgets are stretched enough without adding a tax bill into it. Under those circumstances, they could enter into installment agreements.

The IRS may not impose tax on discharged student loans

Not every college experience works out as Boston residents plan. Any number of things can happen that cause a individual not to complete a degree program at a certain institution. In some cases, any student loans taken out could be discharged by the Department of Education and the IRS may not require the student to count it as taxable income.

What's the deal with box 3 on IRS Form 1099-MISC?

Income can be earned in different ways, which means it will be reported in different ways at tax time. For instance, miscellaneous income is reported in boxes 1 through 10 on Form 1099-MISC and must be reported to the IRS. However, Boston taxpayers may actually benefit from the information entered into box 3.

Understanding what it means to get a refund from the IRS

Now that the holidays are over, many Boston residents are looking forward to filing their federal income tax returns in order to get the refund that will pay for their gift purchases and maybe more. Considering the fact that the average refund the IRS sent out for the 2018 tax year was $2,725, it is easy to see why they are excited. However, if they really understood what it means to get a refund, that perspective may change.

Filing taxes with the IRS for the first time can be stressful

Whether a young Massachusetts resident starts a new job, starts college classes or takes some other step into adulthood, it represents a new beginning, and an exciting and pensive time in that person's life. Becoming an adult comes with numerous responsibilities and one of them is paying taxes. The beginning of a new taxpayer's relationship with the IRS can be stressful.

It isn't too late to keep more of your money from the IRS

The tax year for most people across the country, including here in Massachusetts, ends on Dec. 31. Some people may think they have run out of time to prevent the IRS from taking even one more dollar than necessary at tax time. Fortunately, there may still be time to take steps to make that happen.

Could the IRS penalize retirement distributions?

Many Massachusetts residents spend years building their retirement accounts. For those who did so through employment, the funds put into the account received tax-deferred status. That is, until withdrawn. Most people understand that the IRS could penalize them for withdrawing funds too early, but that may not be the only source of potential penalties.

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